A Fond Farewell

February 22, 2014:

It is with bittersweet emotion that I send this message.  After 17 years of working with Bay Area residents, in helping you create beautiful and function outdoor spaces, I have retired from my landscape design business.  It has been a rewarding experience and I will cherish my memories with each and every one of you.

I wish you many days and evenings of enjoyment in your gardens.

Best,
Deanna

PS, if you are a previous client and have questions, please feel free to contact me at: dglorysf at gmail.com

PSS, I have posted a list of referrals on my blog in the next post.
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Landscape Resource List



Speaking of Veggie Gardening in SF:

Pam Peirce has updated her book "Golden Gate Gardening", now in it's 3rd Edition.  Check it out here:  http://goldengategarden.typepad.com/

It's a MUST READ for any 'edibles' gardener in Coastal CA.  And the revised edition now includes information for gardeners further inland.  Happy reading, and happy gardening!

What edibles are you going to plant in April, in San Francisco:

Beans, Scarlet Runner; Beets; Broccoli; Cabbage; Carrots; Cauliflower; Celery; Squash, Chayote; Collards; Corn, Sweet; Eggplant; Kale; Kohlrabi; Leek; Lettuce; Mustard; Parsnip; Pea; Potato; Radish; Squash, Summer and Winter; Sunflower; Sunchoke; Chard, Swiss; Tomato; Turnip




Okay, that’s a lot of edibles to plant in one month. So, decide what appeals to you and then get started. To learn more about gardening with edibles, check out these links:

Take a class taught by SF and San Mateo county Master Gardeners @ the SF Botanical Gardens in SF.

Grow edibles in containers by Pam Peirce, author of Golden Gate Gardening

Growing Edibles Q&A by Sloat Garden Center

BUT, If you really want to know all there is to growing edibles in the San Francisco bay area, then you must purchase Golden Gate Gardening by Pam Peirce. Learn more here: goldengategarden.typepad.com

Winter Flowering Shrub - California Lilac - Ceanothus

This is another favorite low maintenance shrub of mine.  It flowers in the late winter and early spring, and it comes in many different shapes and sizes.  You can get it as a low growing ground cover from about 1'tall to 5' wide or even 15' wide.  It also comes in small shrubs from about 4' high by 4' wide to as tall as 15' high and equally as wide.  It comes in different shades of blue from pale blue to bright blue to cobalt blue.  It also comes in white.  If you buy the correct size plant for the spot you want to plant it in you'll never have to prune it.  It's a California native and once established does not need summer water.  Below are links to a few of the more common Ceanothus:

Ceanothus 'Dark Star' 
Ceanothus 'El Dorado' - a variegated form! aka Ceanothus thyrsiflorus 'Perado'
Ceanothus 'Sapphire'

And here's a link with information on a few more Ceanothus:  Las Palitas Nursery